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INTRODUCTION

KEY POINTS

  • The population with skin of color in Mexico is an amalgamation of modern-day ethnolinguistic groups with origins in Latin American countries. The Mexican population consists of indigenous Indians, Caucasians from a variety of European countries, individuals of European and indigenous Indian ancestry, and individuals of African descent. The Mexico population is used here as an example to represent Hispanics and those who come from other Latin American countries.

  • The Hispanic population is the fastest-growing ethnolinguistic group in the United States, facilitated by immigration from Mexico, Central America, and other Latin American countries. This necessitates an understanding by dermatologists and healthcare providers of skin disorders that occur in patients from these countries.

  • Pigmentary conditions are one of the most widely shared dermatologic occurrences seen in individuals with skin of color from Mexico.

  • Cutaneous diseases commonly seen in Mexico include those of infectious, malignant, pigmentary, and photocutaneous etiology.

  • Solar dermatitis, melasma, and facial postinflammatory hyperpigmentation are some of the most frequently occurring dermatoses in Mexico and throughout Latin America.

Mexico is an ethnically and racially diverse country of approximately 120 million people.1 The Mexican population consists of indigenous Indians, Caucasians from a variety of European countries, individuals of European and indigenous Indian ancestry, and individuals of African descent. Cutaneous diseases commonly seen in Mexico are quite varied and include those of infectious, malignant, pigmentary, and photocutaneous etiology [Table 93A-1]. Because the Hispanic population is rapidly growing in the United States and its growth is greatly facilitated by immigration from Mexico and other Latin American countries, it is important for dermatologists to have a working knowledge of common cutaneous diseases that occur in Mexico. This chapter reviews these common diseases.

TABLE 93A-1Common dermatoses in Mexico

SOLAR DERMATITIS

Solar dermatitis is one of the 10 most frequently occurring dermatoses in Mexico, representing approximately 3% to 5% of all cutaneous diseases [Figure 93A-1]. Also known as actinic prurigo, summer prurigo, and polymorphous light eruption, solar dermatitis tends to predominate in people who live in higher elevations. Onset may occur during childhood, with improvement occurring during the adolescent years. It is seen primarily in patients with skin of color and in women (2:1). Patients frequently seek dermatologic treatment during the third or fourth decade of life.

FIGURE 93A-1.

(A) A case of solar dermatitis (actinic prurigo) in a female with intense conjunctivitis and chronic papular lesions. (B) Solar dermatitis in a female with conjunctivitis, cheilitis, and scarring. (C) Familial solar dermatitis in four family members.

Solar dermatitis is induced by exposure ...

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